An efficient ship is necessary for a sustainable future of your company. The project MoVe IT! researches and develops practical instruments that can be helpful for inland shipping. With a return on your investment…

Demonstrators

 

In the framework of the Move IT! project, demonstrators are being developed that will help inland shipping companies make the right choices by investing in retrofitting. Such investments will enhance the exploitation of their vessels while reducing their carbon footprint.

 

Because Move IT believes in the slogan “seeing is believing”, visual demonstrations will accompany the description of each demonstrator below.

 

Generation of an “actual local water depth chart”

What?

Why?

How?

We are showing here how cooperative depth measurements can be used for the generation of a so-called “actual local water depth chart”.

These current navigable depth measurements are made available to shippers so that, in future, these data can be used for predicting the water depths of the route to be navigated.

 

More cargo, less fuel and a more reliable ETA. Inland waterway vessels are provided with a basic on-board computer to read the data from existing sensors, such as the echo-sounder, loading gauge, GPS and optionally, the fuel gauges, and then compile the data into a message and send this to shore.

Based on these measurements, the current measured keel clearance is then being converted into the current water depth of the route being navigated. This will be a great help for shipmasters to navigate more efficiently.

These current navigable depth measurements are made available to shipmasters so that, in future, these data can be used for predicting the water depths of the route to be navigated.

 

These new services comprise the following:

Actual local water depth chart for inland waterways in Europe

 

Depth contour lines suitable for ENC devices

 

Locations of depth measurements (required for determination of reliability of depth chart)

 

A zoom functionality

Simulation of crashworthy structures

What?

Why?

How?

We are showing here in simulations the differences in impact in case of collisions and what the crashworthiness of different hull structures can look like.

We want to demonstrate to the public how newly developed innovative structures of double hulls for inland vessels with improved cargo carrying capacity can in case of a crash reduce the collision time and penetration depths on the vessel.

Animations with several side-impact scenarios are showing the differences between the impacts of collisions of the vessels with different double-side structures and a vessel with a single hull or a basic ADN double hull structure.

Crash impact test

What?

Why?

How?

We are showing here the effects of a collision case and the crash capabilities of innovative structures for double hulls on inland waterway vessels in an attempt to verify crash simulation models.

We want to demonstrate to the public how well newly developed innovative structures do on vessel crash tests and to verify crash simulation models.

 

 

An impact test will be carried out at a maritime research facility, giving viewers a first insight into the crash capabilities of innovative structures for double hulls on inland waterway vessels.

 

 

Ship optimisation with CFD

What?

Why?

How?

We are showing here on several vessels (CARPE DIEM, HERSO 1, DUNAFOELDVAR, VEERHAVEN X, INFLEXIBLE) how using a Computational Fluid Dynamics calculator can optimise the performance of a ship.

We want to demonstrate that fuel consumption of inland vessels can easily be improved by making relatively simple calculations that can help shipping companies and ship owners make real profit!

An animation film will show you in a simple way how CFD works and how it can help reduce fuel consumption.

MoVe IT! is a collaborative project that develops a suite of options for the cost-effective modernisation of inland ships. Focusing on the existing fleet, 23 European project members work together on 10 work packages in order to improve inland waterway freight transportation to the standards of tomorrow.

 

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme.